Two-Thirds World, majority world, Three-Fourths World

Missionaries and people who study missions have invented creative terms for the unsaved parts of the world. Do you know “Two-Thirds World” and “majority world”?

two thirds world, majority world, three fourths worldOr have you heard of the “Three-Fourths World”? All of these terms were coined in order to get away from the old-timey practice of referring to the non-Western parts of the world as the “Third World” or as the “developing nations.” Missionaries and missions organizations that visit different parts of the world needed terms they could use for the different parts of the world they were working in, but they didn’t want to perpetuate old stereotypes that some areas of the world were “first” and other parts were “third.” Hence Christianese terms such as Two-Thirds World, Three-Fourths World, and majority world were invented and popularized to get away from the traditional nomenclature of First World countries and Third World countries.

This is similar to the way that missionaries used to call some parts of the world the “resistant belt” (sort of the opposite of the “Bible belt“) because it was difficult to enter those countries, and when they did manage to get in, they had a hard time making converts due to resistance from the citizens and the government. So in order to get away from the old, pessimistic term “resistant belt,” missionaries instead starting referring to this region of the world more optimistically by its geographical latitudes: the 10/40 window. Sometimes the product is fine and just the branding needs to be updated!

The so-called “First World” or “Western world” (or sometimes simply the “West”) is made up of North America and Europe as well as a few other countries that have historical ties to the countries in North America and Europe. These Western countries have similar cultures and values that are largely based on what is often called “Western Civilization.”

Allow me to emphasize for a minute that Western civilization isn’t inherently better than any other civilizations on Earth. For some of us it just happens to be the civilization and culture that we were born into and are most familiar with. I would probably have to confess that Western civilization is my favorite civilization that I’ve ever heard about or experienced, and it’s the one that I would choose to live in, but that doesn’t make my civilization better, and it certainly doesn’t make me a better person simply because I live in it. Good, I’m glad that’s cleared up!

The parts of the world that are not considered to be “Western” are South America, Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, East Asia, and the South Pacific—basically everywhere on the planet except North America and Europe. These vast areas of the globe are where most of the people in the world live, and this population statistic of where most people live is the ultimate inspiration for all three of these creative terms.

The terms Two-Thirds World and Three-Fourths World both attempt to refer to approximately how much of the world’s population lives in the non-Western parts of the world. When the term Two-Thirds World was coined in the 1960s, about two-thirds of the world’s population resided outside North America and Europe. Within a few decades that statistic had risen to three-fourths of the world’s population, hence the later term of Three-Fourths World. I’m not sure what the exact percentages or fractions of the population are these days, but I can tell you for sure that I haven’t heard any Christian missionaries talking about the Five-Sixths World or any other fractions, so either the population situation has stabilized or missionaries are just tired of talking math when they’re trying to talk geography.

That brings us to the third term, Majority World, which is still going strong today. This term doesn’t bother to try to pin down the exact fraction of how many people live in Western countries versus non-Western countries. It simply admits that the vast majority people living in the world reside in those countries traditionally thought of as non-Western.

You can read detailed history and commentary on these terms, as well as a wealth of illustrative quotations, below in the definitions.

 

Two-Thirds World n. [by partial analogy with Third World ‘the developing nations of the world’] The geographical area comprising Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania; this area as a locus of missionary work; this area as home to the majority of the world’s Christians and to the majority of the world’s population; the developing nations of the world (historically known as the Third World).
I. Etymology. II. Critical response. III. Superseded by majority world.
I. The term Two-Thirds World was coined in the late 1960s as an alternative to the term Third World, and it alludes to global population statistics compiled around that time that showed that this area of the world was home to approximately two-thirds of the world’s population. The term started being used by some Christian missionaries and *missiologists in the early 1980s.
II. In the 1990s many commentators endorsed the term Two-Thirds World because the term was alleged to helpfully draw attention to the large number of Christians and the large number of potential converts in this area of the world. The alternative term Third World then in use was alleged to be encumbered by out-of-date political overtones and derogatory connotations (see quots. for 1992, 1993, 1994 Lewis, 1997) and the term *Latfricasia was alleged to be overly contrived and voguish (see quot. 1991; at *Latfricasia, see quots. 1991, 2001, 2005).
But starting in the 2000s, some commentators began to disapprove of the term Two-Thirds World, alleging that it was unfamiliar and out-of-date (see quots. 2000 Gibbs, 2000 Moreau, 2001 Crawley) or else that it was as encumbered by political overtones as the terms it was intended to replace were (see quots. 2003, 2004 Moreau, 2004 Anderson). A few commentators complained that Two-Thirds World was no longer numerically accurate (see quot. 1991 Schwenk; at *Three-Fourths World, see quot. 1992).

III. During the 2000s, the term Two-Thirds World lost ground to the term *majority world, with some commentators actively recommending that Two-Thirds World no longer be used (see quots. for 1995, 2000 Gibbs, 2005, 2007) and other commentators simply observing that a changeover in terminology was happening (or had already happened) (see quots. 2005, 2007, 2008 Carson, 2012, 2013). Notably, at the 2004 Forum for World Evangelization that was hosted in Pattaya, Thailand, by the Lausanne Committee for World Evangelization, the 24 members of the working group that was assigned to study the theme of the “two-thirds world church” unanimously recommended that the term “majority world church” be used instead (see quots. 2004 Ruiz, 2007; at *majority world, see quot. 2004 for an expanded form of the 2004 quot.).

See also *Eurica; *ia’s; *stans; *10/40 window; *Three-Fourths World.
1984 Third World Book Rev. I. 83 : Anyone who has been impressed by Bishop Leslie Newbiggin’s The Other Side of 1984 should read this book to discover how the themes Bishop Newbiggin raises are not new in some parts of the world and in fact owe an (as yet unacknowledged) debt to the Two Thirds World Church. 1987 Scherer Gospel, Church, and Kingdom: Comparative Studies in World Mission Theology 6,43 : In the present volume I have employed the term the two-thirds world in preference to the more customary the Third World because I think it more accurately fits the reality of the situation in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania, and the Caribbean, with their rapidly growing Christian communities…. Churches of the two-thirds world, Protestant and Roman Catholic, have already sent out more than 16,000 missionaries to other regions of Asia, Africa, and Latin America and to the West. 1987 Globe and Mail (22 Aug.) D1 : It is in the underdeveloped world of the poor and disadvantaged—evangelists call it the Two-thirds World—that Christianity is growing most rapidly. And for the most part it is growing at the expense of traditional religions, including mainstream Protestantism. 1988 Stackhouse Apologia: Contextualization, Globalization, and Mission in Theological Education 88 : These new possibilities—now found among women, people of color, the poor, the oppressed, and the outcasts of the “Two-Thirds World”—are simultaneously current, concrete expressions of communal solidarity actualized in political movements and kinds of transformed consciousness derived from “seeing things from below” which, these groups hold, engendered the biblical witness in the first place. 1988 Inter-Varsity 23 : As more missionaries and evangelists come from the Two Thirds World church, the Western chuch must recognize these people as partners in ministry. In many instances, these partners from Africa, Latin America and Asia will be able to penetrate mission fields in countries which do not accept missionary visas. 1989 Pate From Every People: A Handbook of Two-Thirds World Missions with Directory, Histories, Analysis 14,3 : “Two-Thirds World” does appear to be the least offensive and most accurate term. It accurately implies a majority of the world’s peoples and land mass. The countries of Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania comprise approximately two-thirds of the inhabited land mass of the earth and even a greater percentage of the world’s population…. The terms “non-Western missions” and “missions of Asia, Africa and Latin America” will be used synonymously throughout this book. For our purposes here, they should be considered identical to the term “Two-Thirds World” missions…. All these terms refer to the missionary activities of the Protestant churches of Africa, Asia, Latin America and Oceania. 1989 Samuel, Sugden Lambeth: A View from the Two Thirds World 17 : While the growth and excitement of what God is doing in the Two Thirds World can be shared with a tremendous degree of confidence, as that encourages the Church in the West, a critique of partnership cannot be shared because of this kind of economic dependence. 1990 Wall Street J. (24 Apr.) A18 : Yet just as the world has been changing, so has evangelicals’ economic thinking. Avowed free-market supporters were in a minority, but their ideas framed the discussion. And support for less intrusive government came not only from Americans, but also from “two-thirds world” participants, in conference parlance. 1990 Bush, Lutz Partnering in Ministry: The Direction of World Evangelism 65 : The prayer life of many in the Two-Thirds World church is a challenge to our faith. Prayer patterns such as the early-morning prayer meetings of the Korean church, the all-night prayer meetings of the African church, or the twenty-four-hour prayer vigils of a Brazilian mission, can enrich our partnerships. 1990 Dyrness Learning about Theology from the Third World vii : This book is meant to give a general introduction to the way Christians outside of Europe and North America think about their faith…. Not only are we attempting to deal with a bewildering variety of peoples and cultures, we are also delving into matters that are often politically sensitive. Even the choice of the designation “Third World” rather than “Two-Thirds World” or “Three-Fourths World” appears derogatory to some people. 1991 Park “A Two-Thirds World Mission on the Move: The Missionary Movement of the Presbyterian Church in Korea” (Ph.D. diss., Fuller Theological Seminary) 1 : [The term] Two-Thirds World is used in preference to the rather condescending term “Third World.” 1991 Schwenk Riding the Third Wave into the Third Millennium 18 : We need a new term to refer to the still-developing parts of the world. Population-wise, it is no longer the “Two-Thirds World” but the “Three-Fourths World,” with precisely 77% of the world population. The term Latfricasia has been suggested (short for Latin America, Africa and Asia), but has not yet caught on. 1991 Pate “The Changing Balance in Global Missions” International Bulletin of Missionary Research 15/2 (Apr.) 56 : Our research demonstrates that the growth of the non-Western Protestant missions movement continues to be phenomenal. While the growth rate of the Two-Thirds World evangelical churches is a remarkable 6.7 percent per year, the Two-Thirds World missions movement (which our studies identify as almost entirely evangelical) is growing at 13.3 percent per year. 1992 Stassen Just Peacemaking: Transforming Initiatives for Justice and Peace 103,270n13 : The churches in East Germany were acutely conscious of the need for human rights, comprehensively understood. Throughout their document they emphasized the economic rights of two-thirds-world peoples…. The term “two-thirds world” in the East German document refers to what is usually called the Third World. It explains that the people who live in the developing lands of Asia, Africa, and Latin America under conditions of unjust deprivation compose at least two-thirds of the world’s population. 1993 Keyes, Pate “Two-Thirds World Missions: The Next 100 Years” Missiology 21/2 (Apr.) 189,201 : Because all three of these labels [namely, Third-World, non-Western, and emerging missions] have an aspect of value in their use, they will be used interchangeably in this paper. However, the one term that currently seems to best fit this new phase in world missions is “Two-Thirds World.” It focuses our thinking not on economics, nor upon culture or history, but on geography. It highlights the fact that this new missionary movement is taking place in that portion of the world where at least two thirds of the world’s nations and peoples are located\fourdots{ Today we speak of Two-Thirds World missions to denote the missionary movements in Latin America, Africa, Asia and Oceania. They represent two-thirds of the world’s land mass and more than two-thirds of the world’s people.}1994 Lewis, Crossman, Hoke World Mission: An Analysis of the World Christian Movement 2/e 4-26 : The term “Two Thirds World” is being used increasingly by missiologists to speak of countries which are non-Western but contain now over two-thirds of the world’s population and a great majority of the world’s Christians. “Two Thirds World” replaces the term “Third World,” which was coined as a political denotation and which has developed negative connotations over the years. Some people also use the term “Non-Western World” interchangeably with “Two Thirds World.” 1994 Missionalia XXII. 94 : Much evangelical mission is still part of this western modernising enterprise. Christian theology, research, communication and mission are still mostly created in the Western church and consumed in the Two-Thirds world church. 1995 Elliston, Burris, eds. Completing the Task: Reaching the World for Christ 104n13 : I am using the term “majority world” missions rather than the more common “two-thirds world” and “third world” terms, following the use employed by R. Daniel Shaw in various courses taught at the Fuller School of World Mission. 1996 PCUSA, General Assembly Minutes 587 : Two Thirds World [refers to] countries other than the Western industrial nations. There is no consensus when it comes to the language of development. Some will talk about the first, second, and third worlds. Some will talk about developed and developing countries. Others characterize countries as north or south, or One-Third or Two-Thirds World. Others still will speak of the majority world, since the vast majority of people on this planet do not live in the highly developed Western nations. 1997 Hwa Mangoes or Bananas? The Quest for an Authentic Asian Christian Theology 1 : Over the last few hundred years the Church in the Western world has not only brought the gospel to Africa, Asia and Latin America, but it has also done so in a deeply enculturated Western form. Whereas this may have often been welcomed in the past by Christians in the Two-Thirds World, because of its associations with a more advanced technology and an apparently more advanced civilization, increasingly this perceived imposition of alien cultural categories and forms is being questioned and even rejected. 1997 Sugden Seeking the Asian Face of Jesus: A Critical and Comparative Study of the Practice and Theology of Christian Social Witness in Indonesia and India Between 1974 and 1996 14n3 : “Two Thirds World” is a term originated by Vinay Samuel to refer to the two thirds of the world’s population who live in contexts of poverty and powerlessness…. It is used in preference to the term “Third World” on the grounds that it conveys the fact that the majority of the world’s population are poor, and is a term chosen by the so-called “Third World” to define themselves. 2000 Gibbs ChurchNext: Quantum Changes in How We Do Ministry 240n1 : I use the term Majority World in reference to the non-Western world in place of the more common term Third World, which is now anachronistic with the collapse of the Eastern and Western alignments, and its successor Two-Thirds World, which seems contrived. 2000 Moreau, Netland, Van Engen Evangelical Dictionary of World Missions 975 : “Two Thirds World” has been in greater use since 1982, but it is not universally preferred…. In practice its use is mainly associated with Western discussion of non-Western theologies, and the increase in evangelical missionaries from the continents of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. 2001 Crawley World Christianity, 1970–2000: Toward a New Millennium 11 : Though now out of date, “Third World” may still be the most convenient, readily understandable term to encompass Latin America, Africa, and Asia. A major drawback is that some find it offensive…. Recent evangelical jargon refers to the “Two-Thirds World”—but the exact meaning is vague and it is not readily understood by outsiders. 2001 RCA, General Synod Acts and Proceedings LXXXI. 230 : As the church in the West declines, the two-thirds world church is soaring. Two-thirds of all Christians now live in Latin America, Africa, and East and South Asia. 2003 Gomes Mission, Myth and Money in a Multicoloured World 17 : Another term that continues to be negotiated is a more respectable designation for the third world (pejorative) or the two-thirds world (patronising). I am following the lead of the New Internationalist in using “Majority World” as a more fitting nomenclature. 2004 Ruiz, ed. “The Two Thirds World Church” (Lausanne Occasional Paper No. 44) as quoted in Claydon, ed. A New Vision, a New Heart, a Renewed Call II. (2005) 118 : While one hundred years ago 95% of Christians lived in the western world, nowadays 70% of believers live in Africa, Asia and Latin America…. After reflecting on these issues, and discussing on how to describe better the church in these regions of the world, our Issue Group unanimously decided that we should use the expression “Majority World Church” instead of Two Thirds World Church. 2004 Moreau Introducing World Missions: A Biblical, Historical, and Practical Survey 13 : Several terms have been used to describe the non-Westernized world, including developing world, Afericasia (McGavran 1970, 9), third world, two-thirds world, underdeveloped world, and world A. The terminology is still in flux, with political agendas tied to most of the terms. 2004 Anderson An Introduction to Pentecostalism: Global Charismatic Christianity 14 : I have retained the words “western” and “the West” but have avoided the ideological use of words like “Third World” or “Two-Thirds World.” 2005 Anderson An Evangelical Saga: Baptists and Their Precursors in Latin America xixn7 : Two-Thirds World [is] a missiological term popular today which refers to the countries lately called the “Third World.” … The term “Two-Thirds World” was substituted after the demise of the Soviet Union, because these nations constituted about two-thirds of the territory and the population of the world. Recent works are using the term “Majority World.” 2007 Tennent Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church Is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology xix,xx : The expression “Two-Thirds World” is helpful, but it has been superseded more recently by the simpler phrase “Majority World.” The 2004 Lausanne Forum for World Evangelization, which I attended in Pattaya, Thailand, dedicated an entire working group to the theme “The Two-Thirds World Church.” It included participants from across the world, and one of their formal actions was to vote unanimously that the phrase “Majority World Church” be used. 2008 Carroll R. Christians at the Border: Immigration, the Church, and the Bible 163 : The term Two-Thirds World arose after the demise of the Soviet Union as a description for the part of the globe that held two-thirds of the planet’s population and landmass…. Today the labels Two-Thirds World and Majority World are occasionally applied to ministry groups in Western Europe and the US. 2008 Carson, Foster, Holloway, eds. One Church: A Bicentennial Celebration of Thomas Campbell’s Declaration and Address 62 : The so-called “Majority World” (formerly referred to as the “Third World” and “Two-Thirds World”). 2008 Matkin The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Early Christianity 251,261 : Out in the so-called “two-thirds world,” Christianity has suddenly been growing by leaps and bounds, often without any input from the churches of the West…. Christianity has spread beyond the boundaries of Western civilization, so much so that its greatest strength now lies in the “two-thirds world.” 2011 Olofinjana 20 Pentecostal Pioneers in Nigeria: Their Lives, Their Legacies xi : There has recently been a shift in world Christianity from the West to the Two-Thirds world; from North America and Europe to Latin America, Asia and the African nations. 2012 Borthwick Western Christians in Global Mission: What’s the Role of the North American Church? 211n1 : I’ll sometimes use terms like non-Western church, because that might be accurate too, but the term is one of negative identity. Third World and Two-Thirds World are still used, but most consider the terms pass
©. 2013 Mennonite World Rev. (4 Mar.) : We don’t call it the Third World anymore. Cold War categories of capitalist West, communist East and Third World no longer apply. For a while, “two-thirds world” was in vogue for what we now call the global South. Today the “two-thirds” concept is right on the statistical mark. Mennonite World Conference has counted the world’s Anabaptists, as it does every three years. For the first time, people in the global South make up two-thirds of the membership. Africa, Asia and Latin America account for 66.6 percent of baptized believers.
Three-Fourths World n. [by analogy with *Two-Thirds World] The geographical area comprising Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania; this area as a locus of missionary work; this area as home to the majority of the world’s Christians and to the majority of the world’s population; the developing nations of the world (historically known as the Third World).
1984 Rose, Hadaway, eds. An Urban World: Churches Face the Future 64 : With the fact that the Third World (which are are now more accurately beginning to call the “Three-Fourths World”) is becoming as urbanized as the North Atlantic world but without an indigenous, grass roots economic revolution which leaves them with all the problems of urban life but few of the amenities? What do we do with the fact that these “Three-Fourths World” cities are largely poor because they have a majority population which is poor? 1984 Mennonite Life vols. 39–40 17 : How much could the nearly 4000 North Americans use this opportunity to get to know members of the Mennonite family from the three-fourths world? 1990 Dyrness Learning about Theology from the Third World vii : This book is meant to give a general introduction to the way Christians outside of Europe and North America think about their faith…. Not only are we attempting to deal with a bewildering variety of peoples and cultures, we are also delving into matters that are often politically sensitive. Even the choice of the designation “Third World” rather than “Two-Thirds World” or “Three-Fourths World” appears derogatory to some people. 1991 Schwenk Riding the Third Wave into the Third Millennium 18 : We need a new term to refer to the still-developing parts of the world. Population-wise, it is no longer the “Two-Thirds World” but the “Three-Fourths World,” with precisely 77% of the world population. The term Latfricasia has been suggested (short for Latin America, Africa and Asia), but has not yet caught on. 1992 Elwood “Riding the Third Wave” International Bulletin of Missionary Research 16/1 (Jan.) 000 : We need a new term to refer to the still-developing parts of the world. Regarding population statistics, it is no longer the “Two-Thirds World” but the “Three-Fourths World,” with precisely 77 percent of the world’s population. 1993 Keyes, Pate “Two-Thirds World Missions: The Next 100 Years” Missiology 21/2 (Apr.) 201 : In the future, we may need to refer to the non-Western missions movement not as the Two-Thirds World missions movement, but as the Three-Fourths World missions movement. If we add Central and Eastern Europe to Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania, we are considering approximately three-fourths of the land mass of the earth and three-fourths of the world’s population. 1994 Third Way (Apr.) 7 : It is a pity, however, that Atherton confined his view of theology from the Third World to liberation theology. This suggests, falsely, that the best Christian social thinking from the “three fourths” world is coming from liberation theologians. There are several Third World evangelicals of whose social thinking readers of Third Way should be aware, including Vishal Mangalwadi. 1996 Smith Strangers at Home: Essays on the Effects of Living Overseas and Coming “Home” to a Strange Land 41 : Missionaries from Western countries are still a significant presence in nations of the “three-fourths world.” 2006 Ott, Netland, eds. Globalizing Theology: Belief and Practice in an Era of World Christianity 14n1 : There is no uniformly accepted or nonproblematic way of speaking of various parts of the world. Some use terms such as two-thirds world, thiree-fourths world, or majority world to denote the nations and cultures outside Europe and North America.
majority world n. Also Majority World. The geographical area comprising Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania; this area as a locus of missionary work; this area as home to the majority of the world’s Christians and to the majority of the world’s population; the developing nations of the world (also known as the Third World).
Some commentators have recommended majority world over alternative terms such as Third World (see quot. 2005 Missionalia), although the use of the term majority world is not without criticism (see quot. 2006). Some commentators assert that the residents of the majority world themselves prefer the term majority world over such alternatives as Third World, Two-Thirds World, developing world, and Global South (see quots. 2004, 2007, 2012 Livermore)
For comments regarding the shift in terminology from Two Thirds World to majority world, see *Two-Thirds World III.
See also *Three-Fourths World.
1995 Elliston, Burris, eds. Completing the Task: Reaching the World for Christ 104n13,135 : I am using the term “majority world” missions rather than the more common “two-thirds world” and “third world” terms, following the use employed by R. Daniel Shaw in various courses taught at the Fuller School of World Mission. This is an attempt to see the world in proportion and acknowledge the growing number of missionaries and mission agencies outside of the West. The term “majority world” may better communicate the internationalization present in the fourth wave of mission activity…. The number of majority world missions will soon be sending more cross-cultural missionaries than all of the nations around the North Atlantic region. Korea, India, Nigeria, and Indonesia are only a few of the nations of the newly emerging missionary sending countries. North America, the 10/40 Window and peoples closer to home are among the recipients of these new mission efforts. 1996 American Baptist Quarterly XV. 93,96n1 : From the churches of Africa come lessons of how we need to evangelize our cities. The internationalization of mission is a reality. Some of the most thoughtful missiologists, and some of the most insightful mission strategists, come from the Majority World. Seventy-five percent of the world’s Christians, as we move to the threshold of the twenty-first century, live outside these United States and the countries of Western Europe…. Since the end of the Cold War, and the decentralization of the former Soviet Union, a new term is gaining wider use and recognition; it is the “Majority World.” Without reference to history or ideology, it is possible to recognize that the vast majority, probably two thirds, of the world’s peoples live in the largely non-Western, and non-industrialized nations. 1997 Murphy Woman as Church: The Challenge to Change 79 : It must be noted that there are in the world today more religious than ever before. They are mostly to be found in the majority world, that is in Asia, Africa and Latin America. In the West their numbers have fallen dramatically. 2000 Gibbs ChurchNext: Quantum Changes in How We Do Ministry 240n1 : I use the term Majority World in reference to the non-Western world in place of the more common term Third World, which is now anachronistic with the collapse of the Eastern and Western alignments, and its successor Two-Thirds World, which seems contrived. 2004 Ruiz, ed. “The Two Thirds World Church” (Lausanne Occasional Paper No. 44) as quoted in Claydon, ed. A New Vision, a New Heart, a Renewed Call II. (2005) 118 : The Forum focused on the work of 31 Issue Groups. One of these groups, under the name of The Two Thirds World Church, dealt with the following issues and came to some conclusions. During the last century, one of the most significant changes in the map of world Christianity has taken place. While one hundred years ago 95% of Christians lived in the western world, nowadays 70% of believers live in Africa, Asia and Latin America. The most dynamic and growing churches are in this part of the world, with a liturgy, organisation and ministry style that attracts hundreds of people. For example, the churches in Africa have grown faster during the last twenty years than ever before. Out of the 700 million people who live in Africa, 397 million are Christian believers…. After reflecting on these issues, and discussing on how to describe better the church in these regions of the world, our Issue Group unanimously decided that we should use the expression “Majority World Church” instead of Two Thirds World Church. 2004 Moreau Introducing World Missions: A Biblical, Historical, and Practical Survey 13 : Several terms have been used to describe the non-Westernized world, including developing world, Afericasia (McGavran 1970, 9), third world, two-thirds world, underdeveloped world, and world A. The terminology is still in flux, with political agendas tied to most of the terms. In this book the term majority world is used to refer to this area. 2005 Missionalia XXXIII. 192 : [review of Parratt, ed. An Introduction to Third World Theologies (2004)] This is an enlightening, helpful collection of essays. I would have preferred to see a less marginalising phrase than “third world” used in the title: “majority world” would perhaps have better reflected the scope and intent of the editor and contributors. 2005 McClung, ed. Azusa Street and Beyond 318n3 : The term “Majority World” is the term used throughout the New Internationalist magazine, and is used here to refer to Asia and the Pacific, Africa, South America and the Caribbean. 2005 Pocock, Van Rheenen, McConnell The Changing Face of World Missions: Engaging Contemporary Issues and Trends 16 : By using the term majority world, we simply recognize that the peoples living outside Europe and North America constitute the largest demographic block in the world. 2005 Anderson An Evangelical Saga: Baptists and Their Precursors in Latin America xxn7 : Recent works are using the term “Majority World.” 2006 Ott, Netland, eds. Globalizing Theology: Belief and Practice in an Era of World Christianity 251 : While the term majority world is understood by missiologists, it is confusing to the general reader. The average person on the street wonders if majority world refers to wealth, population, or some other indicator. 2007 Tennent Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church Is Influencing the Way We Think About and Discuss Theology xix,xx : The expression “Two-Thirds World” is helpful, but it has been superseded more recently by the simpler phrase “Majority World.” The 2004 Lausanne Forum for World Evangelization, which I attended in Pattaya, Thailand, dedicated an entire working group to the theme “The Two-Thirds World Church.” It included participants from across the world, and one of their formal actions was to vote unanimously that the phrase “Majority World Church” be used. This is the best phrase currently available. It is to be preferred because it is simpler and less confusing to students just entering the discussion for the first time, and it helps to highlight the basic point that Africa, Asia, and Latin America are where the majority of the world’s Christians are now located. 2008 Carson, Foster, Holloway, eds. One Church: A Bicentennial Celebration of Thomas Campbell’s Declaration and Address 62 : The so-called “Majority World” (formerly referred to as the “Third World” and “Two-Thirds World”). 2008 Carroll R. Christians at the Border: Immigration, the Church, and the Bible 163 : Today the labels Two-Thirds World and Majority World are occasionally applied to ministry groups in Western Europe and the US. 2008 Grass Modern Church History 380 : A striking development has been the growth in numbers of missionaries from the Majority World, some coming to the West. The largest missionary agency in the world may well be an Indian body, Gospel for Asia, which has about 14,000 workers. 2009 Heuertz Simple Spirituality: Learning to See God in a Broken World 156n11 : Our community has adopted the language “Majority World” to replace terms such as the Third World, Two-Thirds World, the Fourth World (the poorest of the “Third World” nations), Developing Countries, the Underdeveloped World, the South, the Global South, Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDC), and Least Developed Countries. “Majority World” is an accurate representation of the fact that most of the world’s populations are, in fact, poor. 2009 Kay Pentecostalism 11 : Following Allan Anderson, this book uses the term “majority world” to describe Christians living in what used to be called the “developing world,” “third world” or “two-thirds world.” I have sometimes used “non-Western” as an adjective to describe this group. 2010 Catherwood The Evangelicals: What They Believe, Where They Are, and Their Politics 73 : What interesting things do we discover about evangelicalism when we look at the majority world, or Global South, or whatever we want to call it? 2012 Price World-Shaped Mission: Reimagining Mission Today 6n9 : The term “Majority World” is used in preference to Global South or Third World because most of the materially poor people of the world live in the continents of Asia, Africa and Latin America and this term does not imply inferiority as the term “Third World” has tended to do. 2012 Livermore Serving with Eyes Wide Open: Doing Short-Term Missions with Cultural Intelligence 2/e 184n3 : Majority world, a term describing where most of the people in the world live, is the preferred term by nationals in these regions. 2013 Stanley The Global Diffusion of Evangelicalism: The Age of Billy Graham and John Stott 14n3 : The term “majority world” is used in this book, following the practice of many scholars of world Christianity, to denote the majority of the world’s population who live in the continents of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the less developed islands of Australiasia. Previous terms, such as the “Third World,” the “Two-Thirds World,” the “developing world” and (more recently) the “Global South” are still to be found in use, though all have their drawbacks. 2013 Cohen, Numbers, eds. Gods in America: Religious Pluralism in the United States 109 : As Wright and other contributors pointed out, churches from “majority world” countries such as India, Nigeria, Brazil, and even Micronesia were now sending out Christian missionaries throughout the world, even into Europe and North America.